Issue 2: Eat, Play, Love, Porter Style


EAT

Just Because Chocolates and Confections, Timmins, ON |  justbeecausechocolates.com

Chocolate and Confections seekers, you’re in for a treat. Pastry chef and chocolatier extraordinaire Brianna “Bee” Demers is drawing rave reviews in Timmins for her gorgeous handmade bonbons and delectable desserts, all housed in the cutest storefront this side of Paris.

 

Tuco’s Taco Lounge, Sudbury, ON | tucostacolounge.com

Vegan Mexican food? We’re believers! All it took was one taste of Tuco’s “phish” taco, made with battered, deep-fried avocado. Happily, co-owners Matt Browning and Jessica Nadel, also husband and wife, aren’t too concerned with sticking to tradition. In addition to authentic fare on hand-formed corn tortillas, Tuco’s tips its hat to Canada with touches like poutine and a mac-and-cheese burrito.

Omnivores, take note: At Tuco’s, you won’t miss the meat — really. Browning explains, “We’ve had vegans who were sure their meals contained meat question their servers.”

Tuco's Taco Lounge

 

Bad Bones Ramen, St. John’s, NFL |  badbonesramen.ca

Newfoundland’s spring gales can chill you to the core, but one slurp of Bad Bones’ flavourful, brothy noodles will set a body right. Try the pork tonkatsu.

Soupy Saviour

 

Five and Dime, Saint John, NB |  fiveanddimesj.com

This cozy bar, opened in early 2017, takes tunes and booze to the next level with its huge record collection, bring-your-own-vinyl nights, and an impressive selection of craft brews.

Five and Dime

 

Perles et Paddock, Montréal |  perlesetpaddock.com

In a gorgeously-renovated, sunlit garage in the Griffintown district, Maxime Perreault and Jessica Goulet’s boîte pays homage to the neighbourhood’s equestrian past. The duo serves up a roster of innovative cocktails, accompanied by such surf-and-turfy delights as oysters, organic Irish salmon, beef cheeks, and lobster with sweetbreads.

Ceval Chic

 

Beatnik, Chicago | beatnikchicago.com

This expansive, souk-inspired space, stuffed with ornate architectural salvage, antique rugs and lush greenery, serves up a visual feast for diners at West Town’s new hot spot. But the decadent comfort-classic dishes — Lebanese-style roast lamb, fattoush salad, rabbit arepas and squid ink masa dumplings — steal the show.

 

PLAY

 

Bodega, Boston | shop.bdgastore.com

In the Back Bay ’hood, savvy sneakerheads beeline to a high-end boutique hidden in a deceptively run-of-the-mill corner store. Step behind the Snapple machine (yes, really), and you’ll find yourself in a slick retail space packed with cutting-edge streetwear, plus a covetable selection of rare and limited edition kicks.

Sneak Attack

 

AGO, Toronto |  ago.net

Yayoi Kusama — Infinity Mirrors, March 3–May 27. At the Art Gallery of Ontario, the only Canadian stop on Kusama’s stellar Infinity Mirrors tour will have you seeing more than just stars. We’re talking dots, stripes, flickering lights, mirrored walls and patterned soft sculptures, all combined into an immersive, hypnotic multi-room installation by one of Japan’s most intriguing contemporary artists. Bottom line? Mind. Blown.

AGO

 

Tut’s Fever Movie Palace, New York | movingimage.us

At this brilliant, kitschycampy theatre installation at the Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria, you can catch a classic serial movie. The installation is modelled after the grand movie palaces of the ’20s — think sphinxes, hand-painted murals, Egyptian-style frescoes and a heck of a lot more fun than Netflix.

Tut's Fever Movie Palace

 

LOVE

 

Bronze Kingdom, Orlando | bronzekingdom.com

If you need a break from the mouse and his friends, take a side trip to this little-known gem of a museum. It boasts the world’s largest collection of African bronze art, and breathtaking, palatial pieces from the Benin and Bamoun tribal kingdoms, some dating back to the early 17th century.

Bronze Kingdom

 

Canada Goose Arctic Gallery, Ottawa |  nature.ca

Canada Goose Arctic Gallery at the Canadian Museum of Nature —This new gallery curated by people who live in the North, including Indigenous groups, celebrates the flora, fauna and cultures of Canada’s highest latitudes. Our takeaway? The Arctic is not just cold — it’s downright cool.